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20130124
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with a polarized environment? >> that is a terrific question. it is hard to answer, if part of the answer is the following, when lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955 the senate was and has been for decades, let's put it that way, same mess, hard to believe, the same dysfunctional mess and it is today. bills couldn't get past. the power in front of the president wasn't a party, republicans against democrats, half of the democrats in the senate, southern democrats who were just as conservative as can be imagined on civil rights and everything else and in that year, 1965 if i have the number right, 16 great standing committees of the senate, republicans were chairman of nine of them and senior committee post was stacked with them. they stopped every president because no one seems to realize it. and when they realize the midwestern republicans were on the same side, and anyone got a major domestic bill through congress. and the senate becomes the center of governmental energy and creativity, he -- majority leader for six years. instantly the senate is back in the same m
states to operate in an international environment, and it's clearly a threat to our economic prosperity. and i want to make it clear, nobody on this side of the aisle is talking about default. none of us are talking about default. we're talking about a serious solution going forward with a big problem which is widely acknowledged to be a spending problem. now, several of you made a number of points. mr. casey, you talked about congress having the power of the purse and using it wisely, with discretion to enact spending reforms which are desperately needed. mr. hoagland talked about going back to regular order, something we all believe needs to happen. you also mentioned temporary, extraordinary measures that are currently being used and talked a little bit about prioritization. and i want to bring that up again in a moment. mr. foster, you spoke about process not being a substitute for real policy reforms. we all agree with that. i think both sides could agree with that. but the bottom line is this, we have a spending problem, and we have to also recognize that in the context of how it
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2